WWW Wednesdays: What Am I Reading? (8)

WWW Wednesdays: What Am I Reading? (8)

WWW Wednesdays is a weekly meme that is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. The “rules” are simple – answer the 3 questions below:


1. What are you currently reading?

I feel like I haven’t done much reading in the last month because I’ve been moving to my student house, so the only steady book I’ve been reading is Middlemarch by George Eliot.

2. What did you recently finish reading?

I read War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells, Wise Children by Angela Carter and Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe, in preparation for my next year at university. This month, I also had 2 new books sent to me to read: Shakespeare and the Psalms Mystery by Jem Bloomfield and Weave A Murderous Web by Anne-Rothman Hicks. I also read The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon – a short Stephen King novel in the midst of moving stresses.

3. What do you think you’ll read next?

As usual, I have no idea, but I hope I pick up some more books in a genre I’ll really enjoy, like horrors or thrillers.


– Judith

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WWW Wednesdays: What Am I Reading? (7)

WWW Wednesdays: What Am I Reading? (7)

WWW Wednesdays is a weekly meme that is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. The “rules” are simple – answer the 3 questions below:


1. What are you currently reading?

I have 3 novels on the go currently; Wise Children by Angela Carter, Middlemarch by George Eliot, and Dreamcatcher by Stephen King.

2. What did you recently finish reading?

Last month, I was in a reading slump and hadn’t read much at all. This month has been the exact opposite!

I’ve read:

  • [re-read] Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
  • A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
  • Airborn by Kenneth Oppel
  • Doctor Sleep by Stephen King
  • Painted by Kirsten McKenzie
  • Skybreaker by Kenneth Oppel
  • Sons and Lovers by D.H. Lawrence
  • Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
  • The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux
  • The Teacher by Katerina Diamond
  • The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
  • Thinner by Richard Bachman / Stephen King

When I get going, I think my reading average is roughly 3 books a week!

I’m working on writing and posting book reviews for most of these books; the benefit of reading a lot not only means I can cross more books off my Goodreads list but I can generate more blog content!

3. What do you think you’ll read next?

I have no idea! I’ve been reading quite an eclectic mix of books at the minute, so I could pick up absolutely anything.


– Judith

Read and Review: Thinner

Read and Review: Thinner

Sass Warning: Low/Mild

  • Title: Thinner
  • Author: Richard Bachman / Stephen King
  • Published: 1984

Thinner is one of five novels penned by King under a pseudonym, to test whether his books would be as well received if they weren’t linked to the King “brand”. It is about Billy Halleck, who is cursed to become thinner and thinner, after accidentally hitting and killing the daughter of Tadzu Lempke, a ‘Gypsy’*, with his car. Halleck begins to lose weight at an alarming rate, and further macabre events follow.

*This slang term refers to Romani people who originated from India, and took to a travelling lifestyle. Europeans incorrectly assumed that, because of their physical and cultural differences, these people must have been from Egypt.

First things first, Lempke and his family are Romani. Thinner does not challenge any negative racial stereotypes – indeed using the word ‘Gypsy’ is indication enough – and in many places conforms to negative stereotypes.

For example, Lempke is physically disfigured, thus making him a scarier antagonist. His family also dabble in curses, magic and the supernatural and their travelling business is treated as suspicious and untrustworthy. Moreover, the narrative of Thinner seems to push Halleck’s biased view against the ‘Gypsy’ group, a view which I struggled to (and ultimately couldn’t) share. I can only hope this negative representation of a racial group stemmed from a place of innocent ignorance.

The issue of race in Thinner is not the element which dissatisfies me most, but I wanted to mention it so there were no discrepancies about using the word ‘Gypsy’.

When I started reading Thinner, my initial thought was that it was a quick-paced story, (it’s one of King’s shorter novels) with a creepy premise.

Because he wrote under a pseudonym, there are a few fun self-aware moments such as:

“You were starting to sound a little like a Stephen King novel for a while there, but it’s not like that.”

“it starts to sound a little like Stephen King again, wouldn’t you say?”

(Thinner, page 115)

However, once the curse had taken its toll upon Halleck, as well as manifesting upon a few other characters in different ways, I felt the plot began to slow down.

Rather than a novel about the gruesome deterioration of Halleck’s body or some horrific supernatural occurrences, Thinner became a novel purely about a manhunt from Lempke, with lots of phone calls, interviews, and the exchanging of documents (exciting stuff).

The final confrontation with Lempke and the ‘Gypsy’ camp was somewhat exciting, but short-lived.  Furthermore, the nature of the curse completely changes in the last few chapters, making the ending Thinner infuriatingly unsatisfactory.

Thinner is the Stephen King novel I enjoyed the least, which is a real shame because normally King provides solid character development, engrossing plots and genuine horrors – all three of which were lacking in this novel.**

**The Stephen King illusion had to shatter eventually.

I’ve had a quick scan of other readers’ reviews on Goodreads and it would seem my sentiments are echoed similarly there.

If you’d like to read a really good Stephen King novel, you should probably choose something else.

***

Thanks for reading!

If you enjoyed this sassy review, please click ‘Like’ and don’t forget to ‘Follow’ for more book reviews.

– Judith

Read and Review: The Tommyknockers / Desperation

Read and Review: The Tommyknockers / Desperation

A.K.A Judith reads a lot of Stephen King novels.

I read The Tommyknockers a few months ago and, initially, wasn’t going to write a book review of it. It was only until I read Desperation that I noticed some similarities between the two novels and I wanted to tackle both books in a dual review.

The plot of The Tommyknockers is as follows:

Bobbi Anderson, a writer living in the town of Haven, becomes obsessed with digging up something she’s found buried in the woods near her home. With the help of her friend, Jim Gardener, she uncovers an alien spaceship. Increasing exposure to the ship and the “Tommyknockers” begins to have malignant and detrimental effects on the residents of not just Bobbi, but the entire town.

Desperation is a story about several people who, while traveling along the desolated Highway 50 in Nevada, get abducted by Collie Entragian, the deputy of the mining town Desperation. It becomes clear to the captives that Entragian has been possessed by an evil being named Tak, who has control over the surrounding desert wildlife and must change hosts to keep itself alive.


When I was first writing notes on The Tommyknockers, I jotted down the phrase “weird sci fi”.

This is a science-fiction novel, which isn’t really my “go to” genre and I’ve only ever read horrors and thrillers by King. I was initially unsure about the premise of an alien spaceship and an alien invasion – it seemed too cheesy for the usual levels of realism King conveys through his novels.

Speaking of science, a theme clearly underpinned in The Tommyknockers is the debate surrounding the use of nuclear power. Jim Gardener is firmly against nuclear power, whereas other minor characters are more easily swayed on the matter. I assume that at the time, nuclear power was a provoking topic of discussion. Thus, I think the illnesses, physical mutations and deteriorating mental capacity brought about by exposure to the Tommyknockers could be paralleled with the feared side effects of exposure to radiation.

However, despite my lack of zeal for science and science-fiction, I quickly began to overlook the inclusion of supernatural powers, alien life-forms and alien technology because it still had the essence of a King novel; the ability to generate suspense and well-executed thrills.

The idea of Haven’s hive mentality worked really well within the book because of King’s good characterisation. I felt like I knew most of the characters in the town, which then added to the eeriness created by the residents increasingly being taken over by the Tommyknockers – Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) springs to mind.


In a similar way, Desperation is a story that contains multiple characters brought together through violent circumstances and learn of the possession Tak has over the land. There are some fun references to Tak as a Tommyknocker, or being described as It, while the characters are trying to work out what exactly Tak is. Subsequently, an assortment of the characters become pawns of Tak, communicating with him and following his orders as part of a de facto cult. This again, is a similar idea to the hive mentality of The Tommyknockers – an idea I still think is fascinating.

Despite this, I didn’t feel Tak’s possessions was executed as well, and I was almost disappointed that Collie Entragian wasn’t really the main antagonist (apologies for this minor spoiler) – just one of many. The premise of a scary killer posing as a policeman to pick innocent victims off a highway sounds brilliant for a horror, and I was sad this wasn’t the direction Desperation took.

Having said that, I really enjoyed the theme of religion King highlighted. My only other experience of religion in King’s writing is the warped pseudo-Christian beliefs expressed by Carrie’s mother in Carrie.

In Desperation, David – who is by far, the best and most fleshed out character in the book – is a young boy who has recently become a Christian, to the surprise of his parents. He is fascinated by the Bible, displays a remarkable faith in God and regularly prays. His time in Desperation becomes a test of his faith – increasingly so due to the horrors he witnesses and the near demonic presence of Tak. King handled the character of David and his religious beliefs with care and respect, as well as the opposing views of other characters, without condemnation of either side, which I admire.

Death – violent and cruel death – is another prevalent theme in both Desperation and The Tommyknockers; King certainly spares no expenses when it comes to the inclusion of gore – especially in Desperation. At some scenes, I screwed my face up in anguish!

Overall, I enjoyed both Stephen King novels – I think I preferred The Tommyknockers to Desperation, mainly because Desperation didn’t do what I thought it was going to.


Thanks for reading! Whilst this wasn’t a conventional book review, it was certainly cathartic for me to record my thoughts.

If you enjoyed this review, please click ‘Like’ and don’t forget to ‘Follow’ for more book reviews.

– Judith

WWW Wednesdays: What Am I Reading? (6)

WWW Wednesdays: What Am I Reading? (6)

WWW Wednesdays is a weekly meme that is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. The “rules” are simple – answer the 3 questions below:


1. What are you currently reading?

I’m not reading any novels at the minute!

2. What did you recently finish reading?

I recently finished Desperation by Stephen King; this one has taken me longer to get through – not because it’s not an enjoyable novel or a particularly long one, I’ve just been in a bit of a reading slump recently. I also read Humble Pie, Gordon Ramsay’s autobiography.

3. What do you think you’ll read next?

At this rate, as long as I read something I’ll be happy. I was recently gifted Swallows and Amazons, by Arthur Ransome, so that will be the next book I try and read.


I apologise for such a short WWW update; hopefully I get out of this reading slump soon!

– Judith

Film Review: Hush

Film Review: Hush
  • Title: Hush
  • Director: Mike Flanagan
  • Released: 2016

I watched Hush the other day, and had so many opinions about it that I just had to write down.

A deaf writer who retreated into the woods to live a solitary life must fight for her life in silence when a masked killer appears at her window.

Hush’s protagonist, Maddie Young (Kate Siegel), is a writer who is both deaf and has vocal paralysis – the after-effects of having meningitis as a teenager. As a result, Maddie’s perspective is one I’ve certainly not seen in film before and poses new problems within this horror scenario: she can’t cry* for help and she can’t hear her attacker approaching. So what does she do?

*A lack of screaming worked strongly in Hush’s favour; it was so refreshing not to have to watch another boring “helpless woman runs through the forest frantically screaming” film.

Maddie is a strong female who, despite a few silly moments**, mostly used logic and common sense to defend herself, avoid her attacker and plan her survival.

**I was screaming at my screen: “Why would you do that?” “No!” “Don’t go there!”

My Photo [Hush 1]

This was most evident in the scene where she has a dialogue with herself, allowing the audience to understand Maddie’s chain of thought even though she is mute. Again, this is a refreshing change from the helpless victim status women in horrors are often awarded.

“If you can’t run, hide, or wait, what does that leave?”

I thought the character of Maddie was developed well; we learn that she has a sense of humour as well as clever, caring and independent  in just a few opening scenes. I found myself genuinely caring about the survival of Maddie and genuinely fearing the murderer who stalked her. This is another positive about Hush; the protagonist feels like a real character, unlike another stereotyped, standard issue horror victim.

A minor spoiler: there is blood and there is gore in this film  – more than I had expected of a film rated 15 – and so I had to hide my face or cover my ears at certain points because of my squeamish nature.

My Photo [Hush 2]

However, the real horror “feel” in Hush was not generated by gore or by screams, but by creating and maintaining tension throughout. The dark colour palette of the film mirrors the dark tone of the story*** and the sound design – a mix of sound and silence to show both what the killer can hear and what Maddie can’t – was well done, and reminded me of Danny’s tricycle from Kubrik’s The Shining. Another intertextual reference was how the killer’s mask echoed Jason’s from the Friday the 13th franchise, and this made for a chilling entrance.

***Although, this darkness creates atmosphere for a horror film, it also makes things quite difficult to see!

Of course, there were a few jumpscares that anyone familiar with the horror genre could have predicted, but even these were well-executed and used few and far between.

I had some problems with Hush however. The Apple product placements were obvious and tedious, future weapons were clumsily foreshadowed at the beginning of the film, and  there were unnecessary close-ups of items (a book blurb, for example) to provide characterising information about Maddie – information we were already given a few scenes prior.

However, despite my grumbles, I really enjoyed watching Hush. Even after the resolution of the film, I still wanted more of the story because I was simply not ready for it to end.

***

Thank you for reading!

Please click ‘Like’ if you enjoyed this post or click ‘Follow’ for more reviews and other book or film themed blog posts.

– Judith

Read and Review: Sharp Objects

Read and Review: Sharp Objects

‘To say this a terrific debut novel is really too mild’ – Stephen King

  • Title: Sharp Objects
  • Author: Gillian Flynn
  • Published: 2006

I first read Sharp Objects after reading Gone Girl, due to the hype the film adaptation generated. Flynn’s writing introduced me to a style of thriller I now seek out by other authors too such as Paula Hawkins, Peter James and of course, more Stephen King.

Sharp Objects is the shortest of Flynn’s three novels, but is by far my favourite. I’ve only owned a copy of Sharp Objects for a few years and yet I’ve already reread it around 4 or 5 times.*

*Rereading novels is incredibly rare for me.

Sharp Objects is about a journalist called Camille Preaker, who is tasked with returning to the town where she grew up to uncover the mystery behind the murder of two young girls. Camille has barely spoken to her neurotic, hypochondriac mother in years, but on returning to the town, finds herself reliving the psychological scars of her past in order to uncover the truth about the girls’ murders.

Warning: Sharp Objects, as one may be able to discern from the title and some book covers, deals with sensitive issues such as self-harm, abuse, and emotionally manipulative behaviour. If these are issues that may distress you, this is probably not the book for you.

I thought the pacing was good; on the shorter side, at 321 pages long, it means time is used efficiently. Flynn doesn’t write unnecessarily lengthy scenes and what is included adds to the story – both Camille’s own journey of recovery as well as the murder mystery.

I love the build-up and climax of this book, and every discovery Camille made was thrilling to me – even when I reread the novel now, I still get excited when the crucial plot points are revealed.

Furthermore, I empathise with the plight of Camille: a journalist struggling with the use of self-harm as a coping mechanism to combat the traumas placed on her as a child. I want to be a “proper” writer or journalist someday, and although I was never traumatised as a child, I understand the mindset of someone who uses self-injury to cope.

However, speaking of journalism, I wasn’t keen on the extracts of Camille’s articles included within the book. Flynn worked as a feature-writer for more than 15 years, and was still working as a journalist while writing Sharp Objects. Yet to me, when journalistic pieces are added into a novel, it never reads quite right because the two forms are so jarringly different.

Overall, I thoroughly liked the intriguing and disturbing story of Sharp Objects, the complex female characters and the topics the book draws attention to. If you liked Gone Girl, and want to be chilled by Flynn some more, I recommend Sharp Objects!

If you enjoyed this review, please click ‘Like’ and don’t forget to ‘Follow’ for more book reviews.

– Judith