From One Blogger To Another: An Interview With Georgia Rose

From One Blogger To Another: An Interview With Georgia Rose

Welcome back to another post in my new series, From One Blogger To Another, where I interview / chat with a different blogger or writer on a monthly basis.

This time, I interviewed Georgia Rose, a writer and blogger from Cambridgeshire, England.

Image result for georgia rose book

As well as reading and writing, she has a lifelong passion for horses, and her family. Her two dogs, Poppy and Ruby, delight in accompanying Georgia to book events.

In addition to writing, Georgia runs her own business, which provides companies with book-keeping and administrative services.

Her first book, A Single Step, was published in 2014. A Single Step was succeeded by Before the Dawn and Thicker than Water, forming The Grayson Trilogy. Georgia said: “They are a series of mysterious and romantic adventure stories, written from the point of view of my heroine, Emma Grayson.”

“Completing my trilogy is one of my biggest achievements. I struggled desperately getting the last one done as it was terrifically hard work, so it was an utter relief to finally have it finished. I loved the entire writing experience – even the difficult parts.”

All three books currently have at least a 4 star rating on Amazon or Goodreads, one of the most popular sites for book reviews.

However, Georgia agreed that negative reviews are as equally valuable as positive ones. “Negative reviews do exactly what reviews are meant to do, which is to inform potential readers.”

“For example, someone reviewed my book recently and complained about my use of the F word and the descriptive sex scene. It was a well written review and provided me with helpful feedback. If another potential reader read that review, and decide they don’t like that type of book, they can save their money by finding something more appealing to them.”

Georgia is a member of Rosie’s Book Review Team, a group of readers and bloggers dedicated to reading new books and sharing their reviews. She also has her own blog.

“Someone told me I should have a blog, so I started one. I had no idea how it worked and I scrabbled around for quite a while trying to work out what I should put on it.” Georgia admitted. “My blogging style is a bit patchy; I post odd reviews and share others’ too. I think I’ve got better this year though, as I’ve committed to posting at least once a month!”

Georgia revealed her frustration with blogging to me. “I find that blogging is just something else that takes me further away from writing my next book. I see myself as an author first and a blogger second.”

Georgia’s favourite genres to read are serious romances, psychological or crime thrillers and mysteries.

“My favourite book is Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen – I’ve always said Pride and Prejudice because I was converted into liking it, I think!” she joked. “I had to study it during my O Level years, and really disliked it at first. However, because I had to pay attention, think about it, and write about it, I grew to love it! I have reread it many times since.”

I asked Georgia which author she’d most love to meet. “There are so many!” she gushed. “If I had to pick one it would be Sue Grafton. I love her Alphabet Series and how she has managed to work her way through almost the entire alphabet, keeping the fabulous protagonist Kinsey Millhone intact. We would have so much to talk about!”

Grafton’s Alphabet Series are a series of crime novels, following the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. Her most recent addition to the series, X, was released on the 2nd of August last year.

However, whilst I love finding new book-to-film adaptations to talk about, Georgia Rose isn’t so keen. “If I’ve ever enjoyed a book, I won’t watch a film adaptation because they always ruin it for me.” she explained. “There are some exceptions however; I’ve enjoyed both the books and films of the Harry Potter series with my children, and I think the 1940 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice was utterly perfect.”

In her reading, Georgia also steers clear of the fantasy genre. “I soon get bored with the overly complicated place names and character names, and fictional creatures just can’t hold my interest.” she said.

“I’m also not keen on frothy romances; everyone is beautiful and you can see the happy ending from a mile away!” she continued. “I need something more than just boy meets girl, which is probably why I write romantic suspense.” Since the release of The Grayson Trilogy, Georgia also published a short story, The Joker, which expands the storyline of one of her characters.

Finally, I asked Georgia if she had any advice for aspiring writers who may be reading our interview today. She said, “Yes: stop calling yourself an aspiring writer!”

She explained, “If you write, you are a writer. Believe in what you do. If you want to write a book, stop putting it off – no-one else is going to write it for you. Sit down and start typing. It’s that straightforward.”

You can find Georgia Rose on Twitter at @GeorgiaRoseBook and her website is www.georgiarosebooks.com.

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Thanks for reading!

Please click ‘Like’ if you enjoyed, and  don’t forget to ‘Follow’ for more blog posts.

– Judith

Film Review: 12 Days of Blogmas Day #9: The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian

Film Review: 12 Days of Blogmas Day #9: The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian

We’re creeping ever closer towards Christmas, but unfortunately this blog post isn’t Christmas-themed (sorry)!

As I’ve already mentioned before, The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe is a classic children’s story and film people enjoy watching at Christmas. However, I already wrote a film review of it here back in March, so instead I thought I’d watch and review its sequel instead.

  • Title:The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian
  • Director:Andrew Adamson
  • Released:2008

I remember seeing Prince Caspian in the cinema when it came out. It is about the four Pevensie children, who return to Narnia to help Prince Caspian (played by Ben Barnes) in his struggle with for the throne against his corrupt uncle, King Miraz (played by Sergio Castellitto).

I think Prince Caspian is a good sequel; I liked the fact the actors were older because it gives the characters more maturity and allows the director to explore darker themes, in a similar way to the Harry Potter films. Of course, The Philosopher’s Stone and The Chamber of Secrets were good films, but by The Prisoner of Azkaban, there was more development, a higher sense of threat and you knew the characters could be tested more – which makes for a more interesting experience as an older viewer.

In addition, I found it easier to engage with all four main characters: Lucy Pevensie (Georgie Henley), Edmund Pevensie (Skandar Keynes), Susan Pevensie (Anna Popplewell) and Peter Pevensie (William Moseley) because they’ve all grown up, whereas in the first film, I always preferred Peter and Susan, as opposed to the more childish Edmund and Lucy.

I particularly appreciated the growth of Edmund’s character; he steps up and makes careful decisions, learning from his previous mistakes in Narnia, highlighting the change from his weedy and foolish character from The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.

However, I’m not sure how I feel about the eponymous Prince Caspian – despite the film being titled after him, it still felt like Prince Caspian was still more about the Pevensies, and Prince Caspian was just a “tag along”. Although, I did like the suggestion that he and Susan liked each other, and the competitive rivalry created between Peter and Caspian – this added for comic relief in more serious moments of battles and politics. Eddie Izzard’s Reepicheep also added humour.

Of course, it wouldn’t be The Chronicles of Narnia without Aslan, and Liam Neeson reprises the role to bestow more wisdom on the children. I also love the theme music – you know something great is going to happen when the score begins to play.

When I talked about The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, I discussed some Christian themes from the first film, so it seems only fitting to do that here too. What struck me was Lucy’s fervent faith in Aslan (symbolising a Christian’s belief in God), even when some of her siblings begin to doubt and follow their own ways. This is developed further by The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010), as it is just Edmund and Lucy who travel to Narnia because Susan and Peter have become “too old” for the world of Narnia. Maybe I’ll write a review of Dawn Treader one day…

I recommend both The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe and Prince Caspian as good family-friendly films, great for watching at Christmas time. This is a lengthier review than my first Narnia blog post, but I really enjoyed writing it.

If you liked reading this post, please click ‘Like’ and ‘Follow’ my blog for more posts. Stay tuned for Blogmas Day 10 tomorrow!

– Judith

12 Days of Blogmas 2016 Day #5: Festive Book Quotes

12 Days of Blogmas 2016 Day #5: Festive Book Quotes

Welcome back to Blogmas! Today I’ve been reading up on some lovely Christmas-themed quotes from well-known books I’ve read to share with you.

1. Marcus Zusak, The Book Thief 

“It was the beginning of the greatest Christmas ever. Little food. No presents. But there was a snowman in their basement.”

When I first read The Book Thief, Zusak’s beautiful descriptions struck me; I think he writes in a very poetic way, which is unusual given that some of his characters are illiterate, and of course this quote is no exception.

2. C.S. Lewis, The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe

“Always winter and never Christmas.”

This quote has quite sad undertone. It highlight’s Narnia’s cold, harsh landscapes under the reign of The White Queen that lack the joy, light and warmth of Christmas. It’s a relief, then, when Father Christmas finally arrives, giving gifts to the Pevensie children – followed by an even greater joy when Aslan returns.

3. The Bible, Luke Chapter 2: 10-11

“Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. Today in the town of David a Saviour has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord.”

This is a quote from The Bible, from the Gospel of Luke. This part of Luke’s account tells us of the Birth of Jesus, the son of God. I think it is important to remember that Christmas is still a religious celebration for Christians around the world – this can be easy to forget in the midst of present-buying, food shopping and cheesy Christmas jumpers – and has a great deal of meaning. Christmas spreads a message of love, peace, joy and light – things I think we all need at the minute, given what’s going in our world.


I hope you enjoyed this little Blogmas post; please click ‘Like’ and don’t forget to ‘Follow’ ReadandReview2016 for more blog posts.

If you want to read more Christmas-themed book quotes, I encourage you read this article from Barnes and Noble, from last year, – it greatly amused me: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/blog/10-great-literary-quotes-to-add-to-this-years-christmas-card/

Thanks for reading!

– Judith

Read and Review: Little Women

Read and Review: Little Women
  • Title: Little Women
  • Author: Louisa May Alcott
  • Published: 1868

Little Women is the perfect book to write a book review about at this time of year, as it is set around the time of Christmas. Also, it was Alcott’s 184th birthday not too long ago (29th November), so it’s a nice coincidence.

Little Women is about the four March sisters who live with their mother and face Christmas without their father, because he’s away fighting in the American Civil War.  The March family recently moved to a new neighbourhood, but are living in almost-poverty after their father lost their money. The elder sisters work to support the family while the younger sisters help with work around the house.

I enjoyed reading Little Women as a girl because it’s a short, sweet story that has female protagonists (which is what I enjoyed most as a child – now it’s quite the opposite!): Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March and we follow their progression form girlhood to adulthood.

I also like the very noticeable differences between each sister; Meg has her beauty, Amy is charming, Beth is a musician, Jo is the impulsive tomboy.

The book is about the importance of family relationships and how love, friendship and quality time is worth more than money and presents*. We tend to reflect on these things more as we celebrate Christmas, but I think they’re important values to remember all-year round.

* You can tell we’re drawing near to Christmas, when sentimental topics are being blogged about!

Of course, modern-day readers may raise their eyebrows at certain scenes, such as Marmee’s declaration that having a loving husband and family is the greatest joy a woman can have. However, it’s important to read older books within their context**, and know that however unfortunate you find it, at the time, that would have been one of the best joys in a woman’s life. Personally, although I know I have more options now than a 19th century women would have done, I still don’t think there’s anything wrong with hoping to have a loving husband and family one day too.

** I raised a similar point when I talked about Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

I still see Little Women as a childhood classic and if you haven’t read it yet, you should definitely add it to your Christmas List 😉

Thank you for reading; if you enjoyed this book review, please give it a ‘Like’ and click ‘Follow’ to be notified when I write a new blog post.

That’s all for now!

– Judith

The Taylor Swift Book Tag

The Taylor Swift Book Tag

Recently, I’ve been listening to a LOT of Taylor Swift, a singer I’ve been an on/off fan of since being a young teen. Yet for some reason, I’ve been listening to lots of her songs, so this Tag Tuesday, the Taylor Swift Book Tag seemed like an obvious choice. Let’s answer some Qs with some As then!

1. We Are Never Ever Getting Backing Together: Pick book you were sure you were in love with, but then wanted to break up with

I really liked the Twilight series as a young teen – I read them all in less than a week. In hindsight, I’m not sure they were the best books ever written. Plus, the franchise on a whole gets a lot of criticism, so it can be a bit embarrassing to admit that I liked them. (So I’m combating this by telling 300+ people that I liked the Twilight books… sure)

2. Red: Pick a book with a red cover

I’d have to choose my beautiful edition of And Then There Were None, by Agatha Christie (1939), which features the characters as portrayed in the 2015 BBC adaptation. If you haven’t read the book, you need to! If you haven’t watched the TV series, you need to! They’re both brilliantly made and very enjoyable.

3. The Best Day: Pick a book that makes you feel nostalgic

This question reminds me of my My Life In Books Challenge, where I talked about different books I read and loved as a child. I would probably have to say The Secret Garden, by Frances Hodgson Burnett (1911) because I loved it as a little girl, and I feel like I can connect to the book’s characters and events, given its Yorkshire backdrop.

4. Love Story: Pick a book with forbidden love

I really don’t read many love stories, and none with a sense of “forbidden” love. I’d probably have to choose the classic, Romeo and Juliet (1597) – which is also referenced in Taylor’s song!

5. I Knew You Were Trouble: Pick a book with a bad character you couldn’t help but love

There are so many! I love a good villain. I’d definitely say Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights (1847). I’d also say Count Olaf, from the Series of Unfortunate Events books, O’Brien from 1984 (1949) or Camille’s mother from Sharp Objects (2006). Then there’s always Macbeth and Lady Macbeth too…

6. Innocent: Pick a book that someone ruined the ending for

I’m notorious for avoiding spoilers at all costs (unless I accidentally find out something myself). My brother ruined a lot of books and films for me as a child, although no specific memories spring to mind. He probably told me a lot of the Harry Potter storylines before I’d been able to read them for myself…

7. Everything Has Changed: Pick a book character who goes through extensive character development

My knee-jerk reaction is Elizabeth Bennett from Pride and Prejudice (1813). At the start of the book, Elizabeth is headstrong, but shows she can be sassy, judgmental and prejudiced (all three of which towards Darcy). In the same way, Darcy is proud, arrogant and reluctant to show his true feelings. Both characters learn to open up to each other, as well as other people, and they round out as characters towards the end of the book.

8. You Belong With Me: Pick your most anticipated book release

At the minute, I’ve heard Crystin Goodwin is working on a fourth book in her Blessings of Myrillia series. I’ve read all three and reviewed them (UnBlessed, Fire Blessed, Ice Blessed) and I really like the fantasy / young adult path Goodwin has taken the books down, and I can’t wait to read the next one!

9. Forever and Always: Pick your favourite book couple

I would either say Mr and Mrs Bennett from Pride and Prejudice (1813) because they’re such hilarious characters, or Henry and Clare from The Time Traveller’s Wife (2003) because they have such a wonderful, loving relationship.

10. Teardrops On My Guitar: Pick a book that made you cry

I don’t cry at books! I don’t cry at films either. I guess I’m just a cold-hearted, meanie of a blogger…

Those are my answers! Would you have picked different books?

That’s all for now!

– Judith

[BONUS] Read and Review: LUCKY by RUTVI PARIKH #BookReview #Children’sAdventure

[BONUS] Read and Review: LUCKY by RUTVI PARIKH #BookReview #Children’sAdventure

Image via www.freeimages.com

  • Title: Lucky
  • Published: 2016
  • Author: Rutvi Parikh

Lucky is a children’s fantasy adventure story, in which we meet Brooke, Adam, Rosilia, Heather, and Samuel. All these children are lacking in some way, and so embark on a journey, with the help of some magical creatures, to find what they’re all looking for.

Before I begin sharing my opinions, I’d like to share the fact that Rutvi is an 11-year-old sixth grader, and this is their first ever book. I find this so impressive – when I was 11, I loved drafting stories but due to the lack of technology, publication was never an option at all. So Rutvi, well done for writing your first story at such a young age!

What I liked about Lucky was the switches in narrative, so you could see every character’s thoughts, feelings, and learn more about their backstory. The chapters were quite short, which I think helped to create a “snapshot” of each character, rather than an overly detailed chapters.

Lucky also has a moral message at the end, which I thought was clever, and it reminded me of The Fountain of Fair Fortune story, in The Tales of Beedle the Bard, a “spin-off” fiction from J.K. Rowling after its mention in Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows.

However, I do have some constructive criticism. Some of the narrative switched between tenses accidentally – it can be easy to mix up ‘am’ with ‘was’ and so on, I did this as a child too – which disrupted the flow of the story a little. Also, some of the dialogue was written “LIKE THIS?!???????????”, which I thought was unnecessary.

I’ll also share this tip I picked up from Stephen King’s memoir, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft, you don’t need to use lots of alternative adverbs to describe someone’s speech. He/She said always works the best, and you don’t need to feel guilty about using it often.

As an adult, children’s fantasy stories aren’t really my thing anymore (although obviously making an exception for Harry Potter), but I am convinced that 11-year-old me would have loved Lucky.

It was generally well-written and easy to read, and if you have children that enjoy fantasy and adventure, I strongly encouraged you to show it to them!

Lucky is available to buy as an e-book or paperback from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com.

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Thank you for reading! This is another bonus ReadandReview post.

I want to reiterate again how impressed I am that an 11-year-old can now release their story on a platform for millions of people to access.  Thanks to Rutvi, who approached me on WordPress and asked me to read their story.

If you enjoyed this review, please give it a ‘like’ or leave a lovely comment down below. Happy reading!

– Judith

The Sims Book Tag

The Sims Book Tag

This September, it is officially 2 years since The Sims 4 was released! If you aren’t aware, The Sims games are hugely popular; they are life simulation video games where you can create Sims (people), make them get a job, get married, have children or burn down their house, turn them into a supernatural creature and a whole lot more.

I absolutely love The Sims series (although I was never taken with the look of The Sims 3: I much prefer The Sims, The Sims 2 & more recently of course, The Sims 4).

My Photo [Sims Book Tag 2]
judiththereader, in Sims form!

Therefore, I thought there was no better Tag to do this month than The Sims Book Tag. Enjoy!

1. The Original Sims: The Best Author Debut

The Girl On The Train by Paula Hawkins (2015)! This was Hawkin’s first ever novel, after a life of journalism, and it was an absolute thrill to read. It was so well-done, that I wouldn’t have guessed it was her first time writing a novel. I definitely intend to read it again.

*Honourable Mention: Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn (2006). Like Hawkins, Sharp Objects is a thriller/murder mystery which kept me completely hooked. It raises issues of mental health and self-harm in particular, which I think was quite a bold thing to do, considering mental health awareness was not as publicised 10 years ago as it is today.

2. The Grim Reaper: The Saddest Character Death

I’m torn in my decision making, and either way it leaves spoilers!

I would have to say either Hans Hubermann from The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak (2005) or Bruno from The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas by John Boyne (2006). I think the thing about both of these characters is that they are portrayed continually to the reader as “morally innocent” (let’s make that a phrase, if it isn’t already) and so their deaths seem so unjustified – not entirely unexpected due to the war-torn German backdrop – but just so… unfair.

*Honourable Mention: Fred Weasley from Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling (2007). To be honest, a lot of the deaths in Harry Potter are quite emotional, but not enough to pip first place!

3.Sims Getting Stuck: A Character That Just Got In The Way

Honestly, I’d have to say Gale from the Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins. I know he was “needed” to create a love triangle and cause some tension, but I much preferred Peeta and so I couldn’t help but want Gale out of the frame!

4. Simlish: A Book With Amazing Writing

‘Salem’s Lot by Stephen King (1975). The descriptions were amazing, and I felt like each character was truly fleshed out without being bogged down in pages of mundane details. Of course, the scary scenes were truly scary (duh, it’s Stephen King!) and I think he is a very talented creative writer.To be honest, any book written by Stephen King would fit this question!

5. Expansion Packs: A Series Where The Books Kept On Getting Better

The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling – you can tell by the increasing sizes of the books that more action, more character development and more themes are included in every book, truly adding to the Harry Potter world and experience.

*Honourable Mention: The Blessings of Myrillia Series by Crystin Goodwin, for which I was a beta reader. I really enjoyed these fantasy / YA books and I felt that not only was the story more developed in each book, but that the style of writing developed too, and made the reading process very enjoyable and easy for me!

6. Sims Romance: The Worst Case Of Instant Love

Bella and Edward from Twilight by Stephenie Meyer (2005). Bella didn’t seem to have any qualities, nay, a personality that would attract anyone – let alone a vampire. Plus, by the second book, New Moon (2006), it seemed ridiculous that Bella was simultaneously grieving over the loss of Edward, but starting to develop feelings for Jacob (I smell a love triangle approaching). I was then increasingly not keen on the direction Eclipse (2007) and Breaking Dawn (2008) took, in the speedy engagement, marriage, and birth of a child – all by the age of 19. Even without the supernatural creatures, that is just not normal.

7. Cheats: A Contemporary Book That Was Entirely Unrealistic

The Fault In Our Stars by John Green (2012). I don’t think I even made it to the end?

8. Needs Fulfilment: A Character Who Made All The Wrong Decisions

All the wrong decisions? Did you say all? (5 points if you saw the Macbeth reference)

Although I wouldn’t say every decision he ever made was wrong, Harry Potter from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series definitely springs to mind, particularly as he gets older. For example,

  1. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry ignored the advice of Dumbledore and others, refusing to learn occlumency, and was subsequently manipulated and tricked into the Department of Mysteries, risking many of his friends’ lives
  2. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Harry randomly decides to use an unknown, untested spell found in an old textbook and nearly kills his classmate (even if it was Draco Malfoy, his arch nemesis)
  3. In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Harry says the taboo word “Voldemort” (a word he is notorious for casually using throughout the series), leading to his capture, Hermione’s torture and Dobby’s death

9. Error Code 12: A Series That Started Off Great But Went Downhill

Although I like the stories, I’d have to say The Hobbit (1937) & The Lord Of The Rings series by J. R. R. Tolkien. Tolkien came up with a unique fantasy world, the narrative and characters are amazing, and this was developed when Peter Jackson launched his film adaptations. However, they are just so difficult to read! I’ve been ploughing through the series for quite a while now, taking lengthy breaks between each book. The Hobbit, the first book Tolkien wrote in the series, was the easiest for me to read but after that, it remains increasingly a struggle.

10. The Sims Vortex: A Book That Completely Engrossed You

As an alternative to The Girl On The Train, I would have to say Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (2012). I read this first and I read it in just a few days. I’ve mentioned it in a Book Haul and I’ve done a film review of Gone Girl too, so it’s safe to say that I loved this book. I couldn’t put it down because the characters were so intriguing, and you simply had to read more to access more flashbacks and diary entries to learn more about their pasts and mental states.

*Honourable Mention: Mr Mercedes by Stephen King (2014) – I was captivated by this book and hardly put it down!

Those are my responses to The Sims Book Tag: I hope you enjoyed this post. If you love The Sims as much as me, please feel free to do this tag!

That’s all for now!

– Judith