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Challenge Week: Monster Book Challenge Day #5: Demons

Welcome to the final day of my Monster Book Challenge! So far, there have been book reviews on vampires, zombies, witches and ghosts. Today’s chosen monster is… Demons [sort of]!

  • Title: Horns
  • Author: Joe Hill
  • Published: 2010

I don’t know about you, but I get demon/devil vibes from a book with a title like Horns – not to mention Daniel Radcliffe’s portrayal as Ig with some creepy looking horns in the 2014 film adaptation. Hence, my decision to feature Horns.

However, this is where I leave my opinions on Horns, as I haven’t actually read the book!

If you’re particularly eagle-eyed, you’ll noticed that the following Horns book review is actually a reblog from Stephanie’s blog at Adventures of a Bibliophile.  I’m a follower of Stephanie’s and I absolutely loved reading this book review, and thought it just perfect for Halloween, so I thought I’d share it with you all.

You can find Stephanie’s review below – read and enjoy!

That’s all from me; I hope you enjoyed my various Halloween book reviews! I’ll definitely be adding Horns to my TBR!

– Judith

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3 thoughts on “Monster Book Challenge Day #5: Demons [Reblog] Book Review: Horns

      1. Summary

        The novel focuses on Flynne and her brother, Burton. Burton is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps’ elite Haptic Recon force. Flynne and Burton become involved in a security job that may actually be connected to murder.

        According to GQ’s Zach Baron:

        The Peripheral is an emphatic return to the science fiction he ceased to write after the turn of this century, set in not one but two futures. The first, not far off from our own present day, takes place in a Winter’s Bone-ish world where the only industries still surviving are lightly evolved versions of Walmart and the meth trade. The second future is set further along in time, after a series of not-quite-cataclysmic events that have killed most of the world’s population, leaving behind a monarchic class of gangsters, performance artists, and publicists in an otherwise deserted London. Like many Gibson books, The Peripheral is basically a noirish murder mystery wearing a cyberpunk leather jacket and, after an uncharacteristically dense first one hundred pages, a super enjoyable read—though perhaps less so when you consider just how accurate Gibson can be when he’s thinking about what might come next. Because according to The Peripheral, what is coming next is, to borrow Gibson’s phrase again, well…fucked.

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