This September, it is officially 2 years since The Sims 4 was released! If you aren’t aware, The Sims games are hugely popular; they are life simulation video games where you can create Sims (people), make them get a job, get married, have children or burn down their house, turn them into a supernatural creature and a whole lot more.

I absolutely love The Sims series (although I was never taken with the look of The Sims 3: I much prefer The Sims, The Sims 2 & more recently of course, The Sims 4).

My Photo [Sims Book Tag 2]
judiththereader, in Sims form!

Therefore, I thought there was no better Tag to do this month than The Sims Book Tag. Enjoy!

1. The Original Sims: The Best Author Debut

The Girl On The Train by Paula Hawkins (2015)! This was Hawkin’s first ever novel, after a life of journalism, and it was an absolute thrill to read. It was so well-done, that I wouldn’t have guessed it was her first time writing a novel. I definitely intend to read it again.

*Honourable Mention: Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn (2006). Like Hawkins, Sharp Objects is a thriller/murder mystery which kept me completely hooked. It raises issues of mental health and self-harm in particular, which I think was quite a bold thing to do, considering mental health awareness was not as publicised 10 years ago as it is today.

2. The Grim Reaper: The Saddest Character Death

I’m torn in my decision making, and either way it leaves spoilers!

I would have to say either Hans Hubermann from The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak (2005) or Bruno from The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas by John Boyne (2006). I think the thing about both of these characters is that they are portrayed continually to the reader as “morally innocent” (let’s make that a phrase, if it isn’t already) and so their deaths seem so unjustified – not entirely unexpected due to the war-torn German backdrop – but just so… unfair.

*Honourable Mention: Fred Weasley from Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling (2007). To be honest, a lot of the deaths in Harry Potter are quite emotional, but not enough to pip first place!

3.Sims Getting Stuck: A Character That Just Got In The Way

Honestly, I’d have to say Gale from the Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins. I know he was “needed” to create a love triangle and cause some tension, but I much preferred Peeta and so I couldn’t help but want Gale out of the frame!

4. Simlish: A Book With Amazing Writing

‘Salem’s Lot by Stephen King (1975). The descriptions were amazing, and I felt like each character was truly fleshed out without being bogged down in pages of mundane details. Of course, the scary scenes were truly scary (duh, it’s Stephen King!) and I think he is a very talented creative writer.To be honest, any book written by Stephen King would fit this question!

5. Expansion Packs: A Series Where The Books Kept On Getting Better

The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling – you can tell by the increasing sizes of the books that more action, more character development and more themes are included in every book, truly adding to the Harry Potter world and experience.

*Honourable Mention: The Blessings of Myrillia Series by Crystin Goodwin, for which I was a beta reader. I really enjoyed these fantasy / YA books and I felt that not only was the story more developed in each book, but that the style of writing developed too, and made the reading process very enjoyable and easy for me!

6. Sims Romance: The Worst Case Of Instant Love

Bella and Edward from Twilight by Stephenie Meyer (2005). Bella didn’t seem to have any qualities, nay, a personality that would attract anyone – let alone a vampire. Plus, by the second book, New Moon (2006), it seemed ridiculous that Bella was simultaneously grieving over the loss of Edward, but starting to develop feelings for Jacob (I smell a love triangle approaching). I was then increasingly not keen on the direction Eclipse (2007) and Breaking Dawn (2008) took, in the speedy engagement, marriage, and birth of a child – all by the age of 19. Even without the supernatural creatures, that is just not normal.

7. Cheats: A Contemporary Book That Was Entirely Unrealistic

The Fault In Our Stars by John Green (2012). I don’t think I even made it to the end?

8. Needs Fulfilment: A Character Who Made All The Wrong Decisions

All the wrong decisions? Did you say all? (5 points if you saw the Macbeth reference)

Although I wouldn’t say every decision he ever made was wrong, Harry Potter from J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series definitely springs to mind, particularly as he gets older. For example,

  1. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry ignored the advice of Dumbledore and others, refusing to learn occlumency, and was subsequently manipulated and tricked into the Department of Mysteries, risking many of his friends’ lives
  2. In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Harry randomly decides to use an unknown, untested spell found in an old textbook and nearly kills his classmate (even if it was Draco Malfoy, his arch nemesis)
  3. In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Harry says the taboo word “Voldemort” (a word he is notorious for casually using throughout the series), leading to his capture, Hermione’s torture and Dobby’s death

9. Error Code 12: A Series That Started Off Great But Went Downhill

Although I like the stories, I’d have to say The Hobbit (1937) & The Lord Of The Rings series by J. R. R. Tolkien. Tolkien came up with a unique fantasy world, the narrative and characters are amazing, and this was developed when Peter Jackson launched his film adaptations. However, they are just so difficult to read! I’ve been ploughing through the series for quite a while now, taking lengthy breaks between each book. The Hobbit, the first book Tolkien wrote in the series, was the easiest for me to read but after that, it remains increasingly a struggle.

10. The Sims Vortex: A Book That Completely Engrossed You

As an alternative to The Girl On The Train, I would have to say Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (2012). I read this first and I read it in just a few days. I’ve mentioned it in a Book Haul and I’ve done a film review of Gone Girl too, so it’s safe to say that I loved this book. I couldn’t put it down because the characters were so intriguing, and you simply had to read more to access more flashbacks and diary entries to learn more about their pasts and mental states.

*Honourable Mention: Mr Mercedes by Stephen King (2014) – I was captivated by this book and hardly put it down!

Those are my responses to The Sims Book Tag: I hope you enjoyed this post. If you love The Sims as much as me, please feel free to do this tag!

That’s all for now!

– Judith

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “The Sims Book Tag

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s